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Research Projects and Publications

Title page of After Dark (1862), by Wilkie Collins

Since its foundation, Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research (CEIR) has combined bibliographical scholarship and expertise in information technology in order to complete successfuly and continue to develop a number of key research projects, which have since been disseminated via the Internet. The Centre also hosts two online journals focusing on print culture and illustration studies.

Enhancing the Database of Mid-Victorian Illustration (2010–11)

Commencing in November 2010 and funded through the AHRC’s recent Digitial Equipment and Database Enhancement for Impact (DEDEFI) initiaitve, this one-year project will develop the interface of our pioneering Database of Mid-Victorian Wood-Engraved Illustration (see below) in a number of ways. The database will have enhanced search capabilities added to its iconographic browsing facilities; the core application will be available as a downloadable tool that users will be able to use to create their own image-driven databases; we will be exploring the viability of applying social-networking paradigms to image-tagging. Details about this project will be regularly updated through this blog in the coming months.

Enhancing the Database of Mid-Victorian Illustrations (2010–11)

The New Edinburgh Edition of the Collected Works of Robert Louis Stevenson (2009–20)

The 39-volume New Edinburgh Edition presents fresh, annotated texts of Stevenson’s most popular works, such as Treasure Island and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and brings back into print some of his lesser-known writing. Each volume considers the various states in which Stevenson’s texts appeared, from magazine publication to final editions, allowing readers to discover what Stevenson wrote, and how this hugely popular writer responded to the burgeoning literary market of the late nineteenth century. The project began in 2009 and is due to conclude in 2020, with the first wave of volumes appearing 2011–13.

The New Edinburgh Editoin of the Collected Works of Robert Louis Stevenson (2009–20)

A Database of Mid-Victorian Wood-Engraved Illustrations (2004–07)

The Database of Mid-Victorian wood-engraved Illustrations (DMVI), provides access to over 860 literary illustrations published in 1862. Supported by a significant award from the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC), this pilot database (rated Outstanding by the AHRC) allows users to view high-quality digital images of these illustrations, as well as search by bibliographic and iconographic terms.

A Database of Mid-Victorian Wood-Engraved Illustrations (2004–07)

British Fiction, 1800–1829: A Database of Production, Circulation & Reception (1997–2004)

This AHRC-funded database enables users to analyse detailed bibliographical records of 2,272 individual works of fiction published during the late Romantic period, as well as contextual data drawn from a variety of contemporary sources, providing over 10,000 pages of research materials.

British Fiction, 1800–1829: A Database of Production, Circulation & Reception (1997–2004)

The English Novel, 1830–1836: A Survey of Prose Fiction Published in the British Isles (2001–03)

This two-year British Academy-funded project resulted in the first comprehensive bibliography of British fiction spanning the reign of William IV. This online bibliographical checklist of 748 individual titles, arranged chronologically and into various categories, is based on the first-hand examination of titles by the project members, and supplies full transcriptions of titles, publishers’ imprints, printer information, format and pagination, etc.

The English Novel, 1830–1836: A Survey of Prose Fiction Published in the British Isles (2001–03)

The Journal of Illustration Studies (2007– )

The most recent CEIR research initiative, the Journal of Illustration Studies (JOIS), offers a platform to develop and to disseminate scholarship on illustration studies. In operating as a focal point for this emergent discipline, JOIS builds on the success of both its sister-journal, Romantic Textualities, and previous CEIR activities, such as the Database of Mid-Victorian wood-engraved Illustration and the Illustration Studies Research Network. Like Romantic Textualities, its research appears in the form of peer-reviewed essays, reports and book reviews.

The Journal of Illustration Studies (2007– )

Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780–1840 (1997–)

Originally launched in 1997 as Cardiff Corvey: Reading the Romantic Text, this online journal focuses on the interface between literature, book history and material cultures during the Romantic era. Romantic Textualities disseminates scholarship in a variety of forms: peer-reviewed essays, reports and bibliographical checklists and review articles. Past essays have included studies as diverse as Wordsworth and the rise of copyright, metropolitan art criticism, travel writing, sentimental fiction and morality, Gothic bluebooks, and discourses of gardening.

Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780–1840 (1997–)