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Timeline 1885-1920

What follows, in timeline form, is a brief account of some major milestones of Welsh history and the development of medical education in Wales.

1885

William Thomas Edwards, at the time South Wales’s leading physician, moves a resolution at the first annual meeting of the Court of University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire that there should be a medical school in Cardiff.

 

Cardiff Infirmary 1883
Artist’s impression of University College Buildings, which opened in 1883

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1894

School of Medicine officially opens 14th February on the top floor of the College building, Newport Road (until 1883 called the Glamorganshire & Monmouthshire Infirmary) by Sir Richard Quain, President of the General Medical Council (GMC). The School consisted, in this early form, of the Departments of Anatomy and Physiology. There was also a part-time teacher in Materia Medica (Dr Donald Rose Paterson).

 

Dr Donald Rose Paterson

Dr Donald Rose Paterson

 

University College, circa 1890
University College, circa 1890

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1906

Supplemental Charter enabling the University of Wales to confer degrees in medicine - although students still have to do their clinical training in a recognised institution elsewhere.

 

Cardiff Medical Students - 1908
Cardiff Medical Students - 1908

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1909

First Chair of Pathology & Bacteriology created in the University of Wales, with the appointment of Prof. E. Emrys-Roberts (1910-1924).

In 1911, the Cardiff Royal Infirmary (CRI) which opened in 1883, was renamed The King Edward XVII Hospital for a short time (until 1923, when it reverted back to CRI). During this formative period, CRI was firmly established as a teaching hospital.

 

Cardiff Royal Infirmary c. 1923
Cardiff Royal Infirmary c. 1923 - formerly Glamorgan & Monmouthshire Infirmary.

 

Dissecting room, Cardiff Royal Infirmary
Dissecting room, Cardiff Royal Infirmary

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1914

A deputation led by Lord Kenyon, Senior Deputy-Chancellor of the University of Wales, waits upon the Chancellor of the Exchequer to seek a Government grant toward maintaining a complete national medical school in Wales.

 

David Lloyd George

David Lloyd George, Chancellor of the Exchequer - 1914

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1915

Laying of foundation stone of the Physiology Block on Newport Road, the first stage of the new Welsh National School of Medicine (WNSM). Funds are made available with a donation of £100,000 by Sir William James Thomas, College Vice-President.

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1916

J.W. Tudor (later Sir Tudor) Thomas becomes first person to receive the MB BCh Degree of the University of Wales.

 

J.W. Tudor Thomas
J.W. Tudor Thomas

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1918

Publication of the Haldane Report recommending establishment of the WNSM as a constituent college of the University of Wales. This is successfully resisted by the University College of South Wales & Monmouthshire.

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1919

Prof. E.L. Collis appointed as Professor of Preventive Medicine. This Chair created by a £30,000 endowment from Miss Emily Charlotte Talbot of Margam.

 

Institute of Physiology, circa 1920.

Institute of Physiology, circa 1920.

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1920

Appointment of Prof. S. Lyle Cummins as Professor of Tuberculosis, the Chair endowed by the Davies family of Llandinam.

 

Medical Students outside College buildings, Newport Road, Cardiff
Medical Students outside College buildings, Newport Road, Cardiff