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Statistical Analyses

INSIGHT

 

Statistical Resources for Trouble at Work

Through these webpages you can explore the statistical analyses that underpin Touble at Work. This introduction to the statistical resources explains which sections of the book are particularly reliant on these analyses. It also explains which files you should view or download if you want to review the statistical support for a particular section.

When you do this, you should bear in mind that any choice of statistical methods is open to debate. Other methods and other models might produce different results to the ones discussed in Trouble at Work. Any reader who wishes to apply new methods to our data or to construct new models will be able to do so by accessing the whole original data set via the ESDS archive. In order to encourage free use of our data in this way we have placed no restrictions on access. The ESDS archive also hosts exhaustive information about the sampling and interview methods used to collect the data. In addition, it hosts transcripts of all of the interviews which we draw upon in the qualitative case studies discussed in Part Three of Trouble at Work. These are also freely available for other users to read and analyse.

Which bits of Trouble at Work use which statistics?

All Figures

The source data for all of the figures (1-16) reproduced the book are contained in the file ‘Figures contained in Trouble at Work

Introduction to Part Two

The analysis reported on pp. 30-1 of the sources of ill-treatment (managers, clients and so on) is contained in the file ‘Analyses Regarding the Troubled Minority’.

Chapter Two Fairness and Rationality at Work

The analysis reported on p. 41 of the sources of ill-treatment (managers, clients and so on) is contained in the file ‘Analyses Regarding the Troubled Minority’.

The full details of all the dependent and independent variables used in multivariate analysis (pp. 43-55) are contained in the file  ‘Regression Models – Description of All Dependent and Independent Variables’.  Multivariate analysis of the full sample for pp. 43-55 can be found in the file ‘Regression Models Unfair Treatment Dependent Variables’. The full record of SPSS procedures undertaken for this analysis is contained in the file ‘Regression Models Unreasonable Treatment Dependent Variables SPSS Output’. A summary of Exp(B) results from the multivariate analysis of all forms of ill-treatment, including unfair treatment, is contained in the file ‘Regression Models Overview Comparisons Across 21 Models’.

Multivariate analysis of the troubled minority of the sample for pp. 55-57 can be found in the file ‘Analyses Regarding the Troubled Minority’.

Bivariate analysis for experiencing, witnessing and perpetrating unfair treatment for pp. 58-60 can be found in the files ‘Summary Table Bivariate Experiencing’, ‘Summary Table Bivariate Witnessing’ and ‘Summary Table Bivariate Perpetrating’.

Detailed industry-level analysis of unfair treatment for p. 60 is contained in  ‘Analysis of Experiencing, Witnessing and Perpetrating Negative Behaviour by Industry’.

Chapter Three Civility and Respect at Work

The analysis reported on pp. 63-4 of the sources of ill-treatment (managers, clients and so on) is contained in the file ‘Analyses Regarding the Troubled Minority’.

The full details of all the dependent and independent variables used in multivariate analysis (pp. 66-76) are contained in the file  ‘Regression Models – Description of All Dependent and Independent Variables’.  Multivariate analysis of the full sample for pp. 66-76 can be found in the file ‘Regression Models Incivility and Disrespect Dependent Variables’. The full record of SPSS procedures undertaken for this analysis is contained in the file ‘Regression Models Incivility and Disrespect Dependent Variables SPSS Output’. A summary of Exp(B) results from the multivariate analysis of all forms of ill-treatment, including unfair treatment, is contained in the file ‘Regression Models Overview Comparisons Across 21 Models’.

Multivariate analysis of the troubled minority of the sample for pp. 76-7 can be found in the file ‘Analyses Regarding the Troubled Minority

Bivariate analysis for experiencing, witnessing and perpetrating unfair treatment for pp. 78-9 can be found in the files ‘Summary Table Bivariate Experiencing’, ‘Summary Table Bivariate Witnessing’ and ‘Summary Table Bivariate Perpetrating’.

Detailed industry-level analysis of unfair treatment for p. 79 is contained in  ‘Analysis of Experiencing, Witnessing and Perpetrating Negative Behaviour by Industry’.

Chapter Four Violence and Injury at Work

The analysis reported on pp. 86-6 of the sources of ill-treatment (managers, clients and so on) is contained in the file ‘Analyses Regarding the Troubled Minority’.

As noted on pp. 92-3 of Trouble at Work, the initial multivariate analysis reported in this chapter is the version with a single dependent variable presented in Jones et al (2011), however the corresponding multivariate analysis to the previous two chapters (with two dependent variables: violence and injury) can be found in the file ‘Regression Models Violence and Injury Dependent Variables’. The full record of SPSS procedures undertaken for this analysis is contained in the file ‘Regression Models Violence and Injury Dependent Variables SPSS Output’. A summary of Exp(B) results from the multivariate analysis of all forms of ill-treatment, including unfair treatment, is contained in the file ‘Regression Models Overview Comparisons Across 21 Models’.

Multivariate analysis of the troubled minority of the sample for pp. 96-7 can be found in the file ‘Analyses Regarding the Troubled Minority’.

Bivariate analysis for experiencing, witnessing and perpetrating unfair treatment for pp. 98-102 can be found in the files ‘Summary Table Bivariate Experiencing’, ‘Summary Table Bivariate Witnessing’ and ‘Summary Table Bivariate Perpetrating’. Detailed industry-level analysis of violence and injury is contained in  ‘Analysis of Experiencing, Witnessing and Perpetrating Negative Behaviour by Industry’.


These are the statistical tables which provide the full results of all the regression analyses discussed in our paper in Work Employment and Society.

This is the comparison between the results of the NAQ used in the pilot survey for the British Workplace Behaviour Survey and some earlier research which is referenced in our article in the International Journal of Social Research Methodology. The first results in each row are from Hoel and Cooper (2000). 

 

Exposure to individual negative behaviours in ranked order – questionnaire item number
Never
Now & then Monthly Weekly Daily
1 Someone withholding information which affects your performance

32.7

80

46.9

14

7.1

2

9.1

1

4.2

1

3 Being humiliated or ridiculed in connection with your work

68.6

91

25.4

6

2.4

1

2.4

1

1.2

*

4 Being ordered to do work below your level of competence

54.2

74

31.3

17

3.8

2

 

4.7

2

6.0

4

5 Having key areas of responsibility removed or replaced with more trivial or unpleasant tasks

61.7

84

28.6

11

3.4

2

3.1

1

3.0

1

6 Spreading of gossip and rumours about you

66.1

85

26.5

9

3.3

1

2.2

1

1.9

2

7 Being ignored, excluded or being ‘sent to Coventry’

80.9

91

14.2

5

1.8

1

1.7

1

1.4

1

8 Having insulting or offensive remarks made about your person (i.e. habits and background), your attitudes or your private life

75.4

87

17.9

8

2.2

1

2.1

2

2.4

2

9 Being shouted at or being the target of spontaneous anger (or rage)

70.3

81

22.2

13

2.9

1

2.8

2

1.9

2

10 Intimidating behaviour such as finger-pointing, invasion of personal space, showing, blocking/barring the way

82.5

87

12.3

9

1.6

1

2.2

1

1.5

2

11Hints or signals from others that you should quit your job

88.9

89

8.7

8

0.9

1

1.0

1

0.5

1

12 Threats of violence or physical abuse

89.6

91

6.7

6

1.4

*

1.5

1

0.9

1

13 Repeated reminders of your errors and mistakes

72.0

80

23.5

15

2.3

1

1.3

2

1.0

2

14 Being ignored or facing hostility when you approach

74.1

82

19.7

11

2.7

2

2.2

2

1.4

2

15 Persistent criticism of work and effort

78.7

84

16.2

11

2.4

1

1.9

1

0.7

1

16 Having your opinions and views ignored

42.8

64

42.9

27

6.4

3

4.9

3

2.9

2

18 Practical jokes carried out by people you don’t get on with

92.0

88

6.7

8

0.6

*

0.4

1

0.2

1

20Being given tasks with unreasonable or impossible targets or deadlines

48.1

68

35.0

21

7.2

4

5.8

4

3.9

3

21Having allegations made against you

82.5

90

14.7

7

1.6

2

0.7

*

0.5

*

22Excessive monitoring of your work

72.7

72

18.0

16

4.2

3

2.4

3

2.8

4

24 Pressure not to claim something which by right you are entitled to (e.g. sick leave, holiday entitlement, travel expenses) by rights

71.0

84

22.3

12

3.1

1

1.8

1

1.7

1

25 Being the subject of excessive teasing and sarcasm

83.9

88

12.2

7

1.4

1

1.4

1

1.1

2

28 Being exposed to an unmanageable workload

46.2

63

32.8

22

6.5

3

6.7

4

7.9

7

 

Sources: Pilot for British Workplace Behaviour Survey, 2007; Hoel, H. and Cooper, C.L. (2000) Final Report: Destructive Conflict And Bullying At Work, British Occupational Health Research Foundation/ University of Manchester